Pakistan vs West Indies

World Cup head to head: West Indies vs Pakistan, The West Indies of the old, led by Clive Lloyd, were an unstoppable force but they had to work hard in two semifinal encounters with Pakistan putting up spirited performances. A three-match winning streak was snapped in 1987 when Pakistan secured a narrow one-wicket win thanks to Abdul Qadir’s heroics in Lahore. West Indies quickly put that loss behind them by as they secured a comfortable win in Karachi, which was followed by a 10-wicket victory in Melbourne.

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== MATCH INFO ==
ICC Cricket World Cup 2019
Team : West Indies vs Pakistan
Date : Friday, 31 May
Start Time : 5:30 Am Et
Live/Repeat:Live

Pakistan vs West Indies Live

Pakistan’s first World Cup win against West Indies outside Asia came in 1999 while the teams didn’t face each other in 2003. It was an easy win for West Indies at home in the 2007 edition while Pakistan returned the favour with a 10-wicket drubbing of the Caribbean team in 2011. However, West Indies managed to add one more to their wins tally against Pakistan in World Cups, securing a 150-run victory in 2015 to extend their record to 7-3.The West Indies of the old, led by Clive Lloyd, were an unstoppable force but they had to work hard in two semifinal encounters with Pakistan putting up spirited performances.

A three-match winning streak was snapped in 1987 when Pakistan secured a narrow one-wicket win thanks to Abdul Qadir’s heroics in Lahore. West Indies quickly put that loss behind them by as they secured a comfortable win in Karachi, which was followed by a 10-wicket victory in Melbourne. Pakistan’s first World Cup win against West Indies outside Asia came in 1999 while the teams didn’t face each other in 2003. It was an easy win for West Indies at home in the 2007 edition while Pakistan returned the favour with a 10-wicket drubbing of the Caribbean team in 2011. However, West Indies managed to add one more to their wins tally against Pakistan in World Cups, securing a 150-run victory in 2015 to extend their record to 7-3.

Windies, the almighty Windies, were to take on Pakistan in the eighth match of the inaugural edition of the Prudential World Cup in 1975. West Indies had just warmed up with a resounding win against Sri Lanka in their first game, and Pakistan had arrived in Birmingham after being thrashed by Australia in theirs. Nobody gave Pakistan a chance, and it looked like the toss was the only thing Pakistan would win.

After opting to bat, Pakistan lost Sadiq Mohammad early before Zaheer Abbas walked to the crease and stitched a vital partnership with skipper Majid Khan to set the base. A flurry of half-centuries in the middle-order by Mushtaq Mohammad and Wasim Raja, in addition to Majid, led Pakistan to a more-than-healthy score of 266 for 7 in 60 overs, despite lacking an epiphany by any of the batsmen to go on and score a hundred.

The West Indies, in response, had a torrid start, as their top order consisting of Gordon Greenidge, Roy Fredericks and Alvin Kallicharan was blown away by the crafty Sarfaraz Nawaz and the mighty West Indies were reduced to 36 for 3 with 231 to win. Rohan Kanhai and Clive Lloyd offered some resistance, but there was another mini-collapse as the last of the batsmen collapsed around captain Lloyd, followed by Lloyd himself after he scored his hundred. At 151 for 7, with three wickets in hand and 116 to win, wicketkeeper Deryk Murray (61*) stitched together a 37-run ninth wicket partnership with Vanburn Holder and a scarcely believable 64-run partnership with No. 11 Andy Roberts to lead them to a well-nigh impossible one-wicket victory with two balls to spare. Sarfaraz Nawaz was the Man of the Match for his spell of 12-1-44-4 in a losing cause – and this match went down in history as one of the first ever cliffhangers in limited-overs cricket.

West Indies faced off against Pakistan on June 20th, 1979 in the second semi-final of the 1979 Prudential World Cup, the winner of which would go on to play England in the final at Lord’s. Pakistan won the toss and elected to bowl on a relatively flat wicket at The Oval, but Greenidge and Desmond Haynes saw off the new-ball threat to put together a solid opening stand of 132 to set the platform. Viv Richards scored a stabilising 42, before Lloyd and Collis King launched a late assault to propel the West Indies to a nearly unchaseable 293 in 60 overs. Skipper Asif Iqbal was expensive in his 11-over spell, conceding 56 runs, but also picking up four important wickets.

The Pakistan innings started on a terrible note, as Michael Holding dismissed Sadiq Mohammad early. However, Zaheer Abbas and Majid Khan gave the West Indies a mighty scare with a mammoth 166-run partnership before they were both snaffled by Colin Croft in an inspired spell of fast bowling. Pakistan’s middle order imploded after this, with no one going past 17, courtesy a three-wicket spell by a part-timer Richards, and Andy Roberts who blew away the tail. Pakistan went on to lose the match by 43 runs despite the partnership between Abbas (93) and Majid (81) as West Indies made it to a second consecutive final quite comfortably in the end.

Four years and two days after their previous encounter in a World Cup semi-final, Pakistan and West Indies faced off once again with a World Cup final spot at stake against a brand-new force in World Cricket – India. West Indies won the coin toss and opted to bowl on The Oval wicket, backing their fiery bowling unit – Malcolm Marshall, Michael Holding, Andy Roberts, Joel Garner, and Larry Gomes. Pakistan were blown away, as they crawled their way to 184 for 8 in 60 overs. Mohsin Khan, opening the batting, showed a lot of resistance on his way to a 170-ball 76, but only got support from Imran Khan (17) and Zaheer Abbas (30) at the other end before finally being dismissed having put up a total decent enough total to bowl at.

Rashid Khan and Abdul Qadir did pick up the openers relatively quickly, but a partnership between a sedate Gomes (59* off 100) and a violent Viv Richards (80* off 96) saw the West Indies into a third consecutive World Cup final that was termed as a virtual walkover – but destiny had other plans.

The 1987 World Cup, being held outside of England for the first time, saw another instance of the Cricket World Cup’s most underrated rivalry – Pakistan versus West Indies at the Gaddafi Stadium in Lahore. And, once again, it was a nail-biter of a contest. West Indies won the toss and elected to bat, and the openers, Phil Simmons and Desmond Haynes, put on 91 runs for the first wicket. Haynes, Simmons, and Richie Richardson, then departed in quick succession courtesy Saleem Jaffar and Tauseef Ahmed before Viv Richards took over with a fluent fifty. After the wicket of Richards, however, the West Indies collapsed to 216 all-out, with Wasim Akram and Imran Khan doing most of the damage with the reverse-swinging old ball against a helpless lower order, as they ended up with two and four wickets respectively.

Pakistan’s chase started shakily, as they lost two wickets for 28, before Ramiz Raja and Javed Miandad put on 64 for the third wicket and led Pakistan’s recovery. After three more quick wickets, Pakistan were in trouble at 110 for 5; however another rescue effort, led by Saleem Yousuf and Imran, got them to 183 – within 35 runs of the target. Another collapse followed, from 200 for 6 to 203 for 9 and Pakistan were in a great deal of trouble, but a last-wicket partnership between Abdul Qadir and Saleem Jaffar, including a memorable six by the former, led Pakistan to a thrilling one-wicket win, sending the Gaddafi stadium in Lahore into a glorious frenzy.